Staying Active: Why Helping the Older Adults in your Life Exercise is the Best Care you Can Provide

Guest Post Author: Kelli Huggins | Grace Ridge Retirement Community

Exercise in Older Adults

Exercise plays an important role in overall wellness and provides the strength to participate in the activities we love. As a Well4Life Wellness Coordinator and Licensed Recreational Therapy Assistant, I’ve dedicated the past 10 years to developing tactics and discovering programs to engage seniors in fitness.

Fitness can be as simple as adding small changes to your daily routine to build strength and balance or adopting more formal training, such as the Ageless Grace program or Tai Chi.

Below are a series of suggestions for caregivers and seniors to encourage movement and maximize health benefits with and without a certification.

Movement with Music

For seniors new to a fitness routine, music can encourage participation and keep them on track to achieve their fitness goals.

For the best results, tailor music based on resident experiences and personal preferences. If it is near a holiday, incorporate seasonal music. If there is no specific preference, soft music, classical and easy listening are great for any group.

Continue to modify the music by adjusting the volume, providing headphones if needed and incorporating song requests. 

Building Strength

As a caregiver or as you age, you understand how important it is to continue to participate in the activities you love. Doing so not only maintains a routine but can also provide a certain level of independence.

Strength exercises allow your body to move more easily, making everyday activities like climbing the stairs, picking up groceries, standing up from a seated position and opening jars much easier.

Adding strength training to your routine doesn’t need to be complicated. Household items and your own body weight are the perfect tools. Try using soup cans as hand weights or adding leg raises and overhead arm raises to your routine to help build muscle.

 

Group Of Seniors Using Resistance Bands In Fitness Class

Staying Balanced

Strength, in combination with balance, is incredibly beneficial to seniors. Adding short balance exercises to your daily routine can make a huge difference. Try standing on one foot while doing the dishes or brushing your teeth. Incorporate balance into your routine by holding both hands out and straight while walking or walk heal-to-toe as if you were on a balance beam.

Practicing balance exercises will help you navigate uneven sidewalks or foundation, reach items on high shelves, bend over to reach low items, turn around quickly and avoid falls.

Tai Chi

Balance can also be improved through the practice of Tai Chi, an ancient Chinese art form and one of the most effective exercises for health, mind, and body. Dr. Paul Lam’s principles include mind integrated with the body, incorporating the fluidity of movements, controlled breathing, and mental concentration.

After your body is fully warm, starting with the top of the body and going down to the feet, you can move into the basic tai chi movement with a focus on improving range of motion.

For those suffering from arthritis, Tai Chi improves muscle strength, flexibility and overall fitness. The benefits of Tai Chi also extend to fall prevention as the movements focus on weight transference to improve overall balance.

Try to maintain healthy fitness habits, no matter your ageAgeless Grace

To further improve cognitive performance, the Ageless Grace program, created by Denise Medved, incorporates 21 simple tools for lifelong comfort and ease. The program helps develop and strengthen new neural pathways to support a long and healthy life.

The 21 tools are based on everyday natural movements and are focused on the ability to respond, react and recover. The tools are easy to follow at home and are designed to be performed seated in a chair, down on the floor, or standing.

The tools are uniquely named to make them easy to remember. Some of my favorites include:

  • Exercise Tool #1 Juicy Joints – joint mobility, flexibility and circulation
  • Exercise Tool #6 Try Chi – joint stability, eye-hand coordination and breathing
  • Exercise Tool #10 Rockin’ Rockettes – lower body strength, hip mobility, ankle and foot flexibility and arch support.

The Ageless Grace program helps improve joint mobility, spinal flexibility, right-left brain coordination, bone density, balance, fall prevention, self-esteem and confidence.

About the Author

Kelli Huggins_headshotKelli Huggins, Well4Life Wellness Coordinator and Licensed Recreational Therapy Assistant at Grace Ridge Retirement Community in Morganton, NC, has developed senior wellness techniques and educated professionals across the state for the past decade. Kelli recently presented at the North Carolina Recreational Therapy Association on exercise in older adults. Follow Grace Ridge Retirement Community on Facebook or YouTube.

Celebrating Residents Rights Month: Awareness of dignity, respect and the value of every Nursing Home Resident

Happy Resident’s Rights Month!! The National Consumer Voice has designated 2017 as “It’s All About Me: My Life, My Care, My Choices.” For great ideas on how to celebrate and promote the rights of our resident’s living in care homes check out their site here http://theconsumervoice.org/events/residents-rights-month-2017.

Resident’s Rights Month is an excellent opportunity for care homes to celebrate and recognize the rights of older adults, the rights that stemmed from the Nursing Home Reform Act of 1987. In recognition, I wanted to revisit a blog that I wrote last year during this time.

Over the year, I’ve thought a lot about how we could expand these rights to those living in Home Health Care. Notably, extending the rights to privacy and dignity. Home Health Care does not have regulations, in the same way, our nursing homes do, which of course has its pros and cons (and starts a whole new and maybe a longer conversation for another time). But that doesn’t mean we can’t celebrate these fundamental human rights to our older adults in home health care!

As my background is in long-term care, however, I’m excited to hear about how nursing homes are celebrating this month, and if your care home has a jam-packed Resident’s Rights Celebration on the October Calendar I would love to feature you on the blog!!

Share your calendar or event idea with the #theupsidetoaging, and I’ll add a link to your site here!!

Check out our post from last years celebrations for some fun ways to celebrate!!

Portrait of a smiling elderly woman.Quality of Care and Quality of Life for Every Resident

Photo Credit: http://rosenspearslaw.com/resident-rights-month/

October is Resident’s Rights Month!

Since 1981, Nursing homes across the country have dedicated a week in October to Resident Rights. The celebration was expanded to the whole month in 2011 by the National Consumer Voice.  And this year’s focus is My Vote Matters! 

Celebrating Resident Rights is an excellent way to empower and educate both residents and staff on such an important topic. But it also serves as a good reminder to us all that when we work in or visit a Long-term care unit, we are a visitor in someone’s home.

On many  long-term care units, a regular staff to resident ratio is 1 to 5.  In order to provide care for everyone, this ratio requires staff to be task and time oriented. Such limitation allows little time for engagement outside of the checklist…

View original post 883 more words

Doll Therapy with Dignity for Loved Ones Living with Dementia

pexels-photo-272056Babydolls.  Traditionally, a toy for little girls to play with, hold, and take comfort in has become a popular therapy tool for some individuals living with Dementia. Although this device should not be used for everyone, a baby doll does bring great comfort to those who have had an affinity to caring in their earlier years.

One particular memory care unit I worked on had a whole nursery set up in a quiet room at the end of the hall fixed with two cribs, a diaper bag, and a rocking chair.  These Items, of course, you would not ordinarily expect to see when the average resident was age 92. And yet, two women, in particular, would frequently come in throughout the day to lay the baby doll down for a nap, sing him a lullaby, or like any good mother would show him off to all the other staff and residents.

Sweet and endearing as it may seem the site of an older adult holding a baby doll and “pretending” that it is real can be alarming.  I’ve had several family members come up to me over the years questioning the practice partly out of concern for the persons well-being and partly because a women holding a baby doll is a visible reminder of dementia.

Dolls with Dignity

While caring for someone living with Dementia and Alzheimer’s we have a duty to uphold their dignity.  Dignity is so important that the Right to Dignity is an actual federal mandate in nursing homes. This right is particularly important while using Doll therapy. Like most treatments in Dementia care, while addressing or interacting with the individual and the baby doll, we must always treat the doll as if it were a real baby. And never correct the way in which the individual cares for the baby doll.

It is not uncommon for someone to swaddle and swoon over the doll in one moment only to drop them on the floor (by accident) the next.  They may leave the baby doll lying around, spill food on the doll, or even hold them upside down by the foot.  But this doesn’t mean that WE can do this.  Even if we think that the person isn’t watching we should always hold and treat the baby doll as if it were an actual baby.  Otherwise, they will probably perceive us as negligent, and they won’t be afraid to tell us this either.

 

Alzheimer's care doll therapy
Image Source NPR: Doll Therapy May Help Calm People With Dementia, But It Has Critics

 

There are several common questions people want to ask when they see doll therapy in use, but these questions are often the ones that we should avoid. For instance, we shouldn’t ask what the baby’s name is, how old the baby is, or who the father is.  Most likely they won’t be able to tell you and realizing that they have forgotten such important information can be quite upsetting. Instead, statements like “oh look at those cheeks” or singing a lullaby, are more engaging and empowering ways to enhance the therapeutic nature of baby dolls and will make the individual feel secure and even a bit prideful in that moment.

We don’t have to be ashamed or embarrassed by doll therapy.  It brings great joy and comfort to care for a baby in this stage of their life and your support enhances their quality of life.

 

Does this Mean I should Buy Mom a Baby Doll?

No. As mentioned above, doll therapy is not for everyone, but if you notice that your loved one is feeling a bit more anxious laying a swaddled baby out where they can find them is a good way to see if they are interested.  Even placing the swaddled baby in their arms to see if they attach to them is okay. However, it should not be a forced process, and if uninterested you will surely know.  But, if their face lights up and a big smile appears you will know you’ve just given them a great gift of comfort.